The process of unfolding as a whole person is deeply linked to our early mothering. It cannot happen well if mother is simply not there, and no other person on earth, even a wonderful and warm and loving person who tries really hard, can possibly replace mom. Everybody knows that. It’s as obvious as the sun in the sky. And the implications for daycare are obvious.
The process of unfolding as a whole person is deeply linked to our early mothering. It cannot happen well if mother is simply not there, and no other person on earth, even a wonderful and warm and loving person who tries really hard, can possibly replace mom. Everybody knows that. It’s as obvious as the sun in the sky. And the implications for daycare are obvious.
Studies have been done to get an annual salary estimate for a female caregiver. One survey suggested that the value of a mother's work, if she were paid the average wage for each task she performs in running the household and caring for her children, is $117,867 per year.[41] The reason for the high salary is because mothers typically perform about 10 different job functions throughout the week. Some of these job functions are poorly paid, including cleaning, driving, caring for children, and washing laundry, but others, especially financial and managerial tasks that the survey equated with being the Chief Executive Officer of a company, are highly paid. Neither a nanny nor a housekeeper makes nearly as much money, and almost all of these tasks except direct child care also have to be done by non-parents. The value of unpaid childcare is also an important figure in various legal entities. Expert witnesses (most often economists) are occasionally brought into court cases to give estimates on the value of unpaid labor. By giving estimation, the plaintiff or defendant can be fairly compensated for their labor.
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[62] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.

How Much Income For Child Care


Kitas are typically run by public (i. e. communal) and "free" carriers (such as the churches, other religious organizations, social organizations with a background in the trade unions and profit-orientated corporations), and subsidized by the states (Länder). In this case, the care is open to the general public—e. g. a Protestant or Muslim child may claim a place in a Kita run by the catholic church.
The first crèche was opened by Firmin Marbeau on 14 November 1844 in Paris,[61] The Société des Crèches was recognized by the French government in 1869. Originating in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th century, day cares were established in the United States by private charities in the 1850s, such as the Charity Organization Society founded by Ansley Wilcox. The Fitch Creche in Buffalo, New York was known as the first day center for working mothers in the United States. Another at that time was the New York Day Nursery in 1854. https://youtube.com/watch?v=eeCahRCgOfI
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